Disconnects in the Distracted-Driving Blame Game

In 1930, former Massachusetts state senator George Parker tried to ban car radios because they were too distracting. He invoked the ire of both the Radio Manufacturers Association and motorists, who loved driving to music, even though early radios were expensive and sometimes burst into flames. After consumers protested at his office, Parker dropped the effort and decided to focus on drunken driving instead.

Drivers today are similarly attached to their cellphones and in-car technology. But unlike the drivers of the 1930s, they’re conflicted over efforts to regulate them.

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