Barb Gonzalez

Barb Gonzalez
Power Your Profits

Today’s home theater power accessories are much more than simple surge protectors. Failing to attach power to home theater sales not only is a missed opportunity but a disservice to the customer. Still, many sales associates have only a vague understanding of exactly how power conditioners work. It’s difficult to demonstrate the benefits of a better quality power conditioner without a simple explanation to the customer. But once the device is hooked up, your customer will notice the difference it makes to image and sound quality. That experience will help close the sale. Most people know they need to protect their home theater and

The Wait Is Over

As prices fall and the selection of second-generation high-definition DVD players improve, it’s time for retailers to begin including them as part of a full home entertainment solution. That should not be too difficult, given the superior image they add to any A/V package. The best way to sell a high-definition player is to simply demonstrate the amazing picture quality and communicate why it can’t be achieved through any other device. It’s also important that salespeople explain the features and benefits of the various players to help customers choose the right one and, with the proper positioning, a 1080p TV to go along

The Wait is Over

As prices fall and the selection of second-generation high-definition DVD players improve, it’s time for retailers to begin including them as part of a full home entertainment solution. That should not be too difficult, given the superior image they add to any A/V package. The best way to sell a high-definition player is to simply demonstrate the amazing picture quality and communicate why it can’t be achieved through any other device. It’s also important that salespeople explain the features and benefits of the various players to help your customer choose the right one and, with the proper positioning, a 1080p TV to go

'Refreshing' Idea

It may be the halfback seems to leave a feathering trail on your LCD TV as he runs toward the goal during Monday Night Football. Or perhaps the fast-paced chase scene in Casino Royale is a bit blurred. In a quest for the perfect moving picture, TV manufacturers have found that altering the refresh rate of flat panel TVs can solve many ills that cause action to blur. No longer strapped by scanning technology of CRT and the NTSC broadcasts, they are free to change how often the screen refreshes. To sell this benefit, you will want to be able to explain refresh rates

Simply Speaking: Understanding 1080p, Before You Try to Sell It

The newest buzzword in HDTV this year is 1080p. The “p” in 480p, 720p and 1080p is for “progressive scan.” While the phrase has become part of your everyday vocabulary, chances are your customers are unfamiliar with it. To help close the sale of higher-end TVs, especially HD units, you’ll want to be able to clearly explain the differences between 1080i and 1080p. Too often a sales associate will dismiss the need for 1080p, saying there is no high definition content compatible for that technology; only for 1080i. That’s changing. A wide variety of 1080p TVs as well as some high definition optical disc

Wrapping Up the HDMI Cable Sale

With HDMI cable surpassing the price of some DVD players, customers will definitely want to know why they need one. To close the sale, you’ll have to explain its features and put to bed rumors and misconceptions. First off, HDMI stands for High Definition Multimedia Interface. That is, it carries both audio and video signals. The cable’s ultra-wideband capability can support the best audio and video information available. It also features two-way communications that allow your home theater components to talk to each other. The benefits are many. In a nutshell, the latest 1.3 version of HDMI is capable of interoperability, transferring 1080p video with Deep

The “Upconverted”

It happens in discussions about upconversion or video scaling, during which everyone is talking about something different: de-interlacing, 3:2 pulldown, or other video processing. This is tech talk, so why bring it up to customers? When a customer buys a new big-screen HDTV, they’ll need to understand that not all programming is in high definition and must be upconverted. You’ll want to suggest they add an upconverted DVD player. To which their response will be “What’s that?” How do you explain it quickly without oversimplifying to the point of misinformation or discussing the complex algorithms of a video processor without losing your customer

Resolution Rap

With all we’ve been learning about HDTV and new technologies, it is rare to find a sales associate who confidently, comfortably and concisely can explain resolution and what makes one TV better than the other. I’ve heard misinformation and lots of hesitation—the former being a disservice to the customer, the latter resulting in a lost sale or nervous customer. Through my years of experience, research and conversations with the inventors of high definition, I offer you some simple ways to explain resolution and debunk some misinformation. How do you talk to the average customer about HDTV resolution without watching their eyes glaze over

IPTV or Not IPTV?

I ventured out to the IPTV World conference in San Francisco recently looking for distinctions between “internet TV” and IPTV. Internet TV is the act of finding videos on the Internet to watch or download. For example, yesterday I watched the “Kidnapped” premiere episode on iVillage. Compared to IPTV that is like a cable set top box on software steroids. It is being brought to you by large telecoms like AT&T and Verizon. It will act much like digital cable or satellite of today, offering typical channels with scheduled programming—like the networks, HBO or Bravo (referred to as “linear channels”)—pay per view and “VOD”(video