Devendra Mishra

Devendra Mishra
VMI Could Help Retailers

When the entertainment industry launched direct-to-store delivery of DVDs more than 10 years ago, the category’s overall success was rooted in the collaboration between the retailer providing point-of-sale information and the studio turning that data into actionable market intelligence and taking control of the process. For the first time in retail management history, the roles of the players in the supply chain had been rearranged. The role of monitoring product on the shelves was passed from the retailers to the suppliers— wholesalers, manufacturers, distributors—who now had to manage their own product and decide when to replenish the retail shelves. The result was significant reduction

Perfecting the Last 100 Feet

The battleground for the maximization of customer satisfaction depends to a large extent on execution between the receiving docks of a retail store and its checkout counters. The steps taken in that final lap of the consumer electronics supply chain are burdened by cost, inaccuracy and time spent tracking product flow and taking physical inventory. The problem is exacerbated by inadequate business processes, lack of synchronized information, quality of employees and the reality that information cannot be economically and accurately gathered at the necessary points in the process. Mark Fisher, vice president of Strategic Initiatives for the Entertainment Merchants Association (EMA), estimates it

How Best Buy Develops Private Label Lines

IBM’s recent Summit for Consumer Electronics Emerging Technologies proved product innovation is the main driver of sales growth and profitability. To hammer home the point, George Bailey, IBM’s general manager of Global Electronics Industry, reminded the audience of CE executives that, perhaps more than any other industry, consumer electronics relies on continuous innovation, and to be successful CE companies must focus on delivering integrated solutions, not just innovative products. The strategy is not lost on Best Buy. Fernando Silva, Best Buy’s director of Private Label Product Lines, delivered a keynote address that left no doubt that we live in a consumer-centric world, in which collaboration from

How Best Buy Uses Customer Input to Develop Private Label Line

IBM’s recent Summit for Consumer Electronics Emerging Technologies proved product innovation is the main driver of sales growth and profitability. To hammer home the point, George Bailey, IBM’s general manager of Global Electronics Industry, reminded the audience of CE executives that perhaps more than any other industry consumer electronics relies on continuous innovation, and to be successful CE companies must focus on delivering integrated solutions to consumers, not just innovative products. Best Buy says it’s doing just that. Fernando Silva, Best Buy’s director of Private Label Product Lines, delivered a keynote address at the summit that left no doubt that we live in

CE Industry Forges Tighter Links in Supply Chain

Top retailers, manufacturers and service and technology solution providers are revealing a new spirit of collaboration in supply chain management, agreeing that an effective end-to-end process benefits both individual companies and the entire industry they serve. Industry leaders told us that over the last 30 years supply chain management has been an exclusive initiative to reduce inventory and costs of logistics while ensuring product availability to customers. But today leading manufacturing companies such as Sony, Samsung, HP and IBM incorporate principles of supply chain management not only in operations but in sales and marketing. The initiatives help control costs and generate greater revenues through

Supply Chain Feature

The Death of Time and Distance: A Holistic Approach to Supply Chain Management. Supply chain management (SCM) is an integral and expensive collaboration between warehouses, manufacturers, and consumers. Getting the parts in and the product out with minimal cost and maximum output is an ongoing dilemma. In this article, CE Supply Chain News editor and Consumer Electronics Supply Chain Academy Conference Chairman (CESCA), Devendra Mishra discusses the current SCM directions, strategies, and tactics, and how organizations can improve their processes. Source: Graziado Business Report

Tale Of Two Retailers

During the first Consumer Electronics Supply Chain Academy at CES 2007 (see pg. 100 for more on the conference), all segments of the consumer electronics industry supply chain—including retailers, manufacturers, distributors, TPLs, service providers and solution providers—addressed the growing challenges to increase revenues and gross margins while taking costs out of the total CE supply chain. This article is the first in a series that will highlight the objectives, strategies and tactics introduced in a true spirit of collaboration by the leaders in the industry at the CECSA conference. The first deals with the initiatives of two premier retailers: Best Buy and Circuit City. Executives

Optimizing the Supply Chain

Businesses are beginning to recognize the potential of going beyond the historical view of the supply chain as a cost center to its emerging role as a strategic enabler of increased sales and margins. Dell and Nokia, for example, focused on using their supply chains to enhance customer satisfaction, which resulted in their ability to gain market share throughout the ’90s. Once a consumer-centric philosophy is adopted and executed by an enterprise and a supply chain management organization established, there are fundamental strategies for maximizing the benefits. The three variables—inventory turns, return on assets and cost of goods sold as a percent of

Feeding Best Buy

In 2004, Best Buy announced its strategic intent to bring about a cultural transformation of the company by launching a program called “Consumer Centricity.” As Brad Anderson, the company’s vice chairman and CEO put it, “This enables us to engage more deeply with customers by empowering employees to deliver tailored products, solutions and services to customers through our stores, Web sites, call centers and in-home services.” In short, Best Buy was proposing to turn the typical retail information flow on its head, from “top-down to bottom-up” where consumer demand would ultimately drive its operations and supply chain—from the factories halfway around the world, to