Lyndsey Farrow

Lyndsey Farrow
Poor Product Packaging Hurts Sales

We've all seen terrible product packaging. It's busy. It's crowded. It has too many colors and fonts. It has strange art. You can't see the product through the clutter. You can't be sure what the product actually does. Consumers might notice the package and pick it up for a closer look. But rarely do they…

Increase Retail Sales With Better Packaging

We've all seen terrible product packaging. It's busy. It's crowded. It has too many colors and fonts. It has strange art. You can't see the product through the clutter. You certainly can't be sure of what this thing does.

Consumers might notice the package and pick it up for a closer look. But rarely do they put a product with subpar packaging into their shopping cart. So why do manufacturers continue to ship products in terrible packaging? It certainly doesn't help sales and it does nothing but hurt the merchandising strategies of retailers.

Product packaging has its basic functions, such as protecting a product from damage, keeping all pieces of a product together, and identifying what's in the package. But a box on a retailer's shelf or show floor has the potential to do much more. The placement serves as advertising at a very crucial point: when the customer actually makes the decision to buy. Packaging lures a customer in, confirms their purchasing decision or changes their mind as they're scanning the shelves. Product packaging conveys quality. Would you pick the skillfully branded, quality packaged product or one that looks cheap, cluttered and lacking valuable information, even though both products do the same exact thing? The answer is obvious. Products with higher perceived value stand out in a consumers mind.