Paul Sabbah

Paul Sabbah
Successful CE Retailing, The Nordic Way

The challenges of operating a retail chain in the 21st century have been well documented. From category killers like Best Buy and Bed/Bath to the 800-pound gorilla, Wal-Mart, big and small retailers face staffing, customer loyalty and returns, and e-commerce issues which make growth a tough task and profitability seem like a mirage.

Successful Change Means Survival

Do you have any change? During the Great Depression, that phrase had great significance. With unemployment at 20 percent and higher, a few cents meant the difference between eating that night or going hungry. The people that you meet today who lived through the Depression can you tell you all about that. They seem permanently…

Successful Change Means Survival

Do you have any change? Back in the Great Depression that phrase had great significance. With unemployment at 20 percent and higher, a few cents meant the difference between eating that night or going hungry.

The people that you meet today who lived through the Depression can you tell you all about that.  They seem permanently affected by that time period; scarred in some way.   They are more conscious of waste, less likely to be extravagant and often puzzled when the younger generation throws money around.  They seem to keep cars longer and show more interest in maintaining what is old rather than building something new. Depression-era people were actually changed personally by the width and breadth of the downturn.

Today, change is the order of the day for businesses all across the country.  A business' successful adaptation to change can mean that its employees put food on the table.  In good times, businesses could be stagnant, stubbornly refusing to change or adapt to market conditions.  But in tough economic times, markets are cruel and unforgiving, and those businesses that don't embrace change often suffer.  So the Depression-era mentality of maintaining what is old might actually be counterproductive in today's economy: today we just might need to tear things down and rebuild them for a new paradigm.

America's Can-Do Spirit Will Prevail


A global financial crisis, a history-making presidential election, spiking commodity prices, massive layoffs and fears of a protracted recession. Looks like just another day at the office.

Retailers Have to Adopt "Must-Do" Spirit

A global financial crisis, a history-making presidential election, spiking commodity prices, massive layoffs and fears of a protracted recession. Looks like just another day at the office.

A is For Accessories

The Accessories market continues to be a standout in the consumer electronics industry, emerging from the background into a major force over the last several years. And it continues to shine. The Consumer Electronics Association’s (CEA) most recent sales and forecast report estimates sales of accessories will grow eight percent to nearly $9 billion this year. It predicts accessories will account for 11 percent of total CE industry growth this year with $16 billion in shipment revenues.

Accessories Will Shine in 2008

“Out of clutter, find simplicity. From discord, find harmony. In the middle of difficulty, lies opportunity.” To say that 2007 was a challenging year in consumer electronics is a bit of an understatement, but with every tough experience come hard-earned lessons for all involved. When Albert Einstein wrote those words about simplicity and harmony, he may not have been able to imagine a U.S. economy beset by surging oil prices, a weakening dollar, a housing slump, financial woes and of course a war fought thousands of miles from home. But despite these economic and political troubles, the consumer, the vendor community and retailers can

Pull Up A Chair

“The world is getting flatter and flatter, faster and faster.” I read the quote this past summer in the promotional material given out at the SinoCES, the annual CE show co-sponsored by CEA in China. The show, and the accompanying retail and corporate visits organized for the CEA delegation that visited the SinoCES, brought home this notion with resounding certainty. These are, to paraphrase the ancient Chinese proverb, interesting times. Rapidly increasing competition for retail floor space from all parts of the globe, coupled with the adoption of “Internet-time” as the de facto standard for business, makes doing business more of a challenge than ever. For