Exceptional Innovations

NuVo Brings in Mahan
August 7, 2009

NuVo Technologies this week announced that it has named Jeff Mahan as its new western regional sales manager.

AVAD Partners With Exceptional Innovation
October 27, 2008

AVAD announced last week that it has reached an exclusive distribution agreement with Exceptional Innovation, the company behind the home automation software Life|ware. Under the deal, Life|ware becomes an official AVAD Integration Partner.

New, Now and Next in Technology
July 1, 2008

What makes a new technology a hit or a miss? A good idea, great execution and wisdom, or dumb-like timing of the right introduction that can generate the hits? Anything else and you can miss. Dealers whose business is to keep up with the unending parade and fast pace of new entertainment and life-enhancing gadgetry make judgments every day about whether to carry or ignore new tech offerings, learn all they can about the few chosen products and then figure out how to market and sell them. Dealerscope recently spoke with some very keen judges of the good, the bad and the ugly

“Technomenities”: The Pleasure-Tronics Trend at CEDIA ‘07
September 10, 2007

Custom installer Thomas Springler, owner of Audio Video Design Group, flew from Bergen County, NJ, to Denver to walk the CEDIA showfloor for one overarching reason, he says: “I’m always looking for something to make life easier.” What Springler found at this year’s CEDIA conference was a manufacturing culture that’s not only ready to offer his customers practical, energy-saving or time-saving home control products, but one that’s becoming increasingly creative about linking customers to every pleasure in their neighborhood, all electronically. Springler’s MDU customers, those living in condos or high-rise Manhattan apartment buildings, have the best chance of ordering up “technomenities”

Mike Seamons, Vice President, Marketing, Exceptional Innovation
June 7, 2007

Age: 35 Education: B.A., Brigham Young University Career History: Mike was owner of Great Harvest Bread Company, Reno, Nev.; sales Engineering director for STSN, Salt Lake City, Utah; and president of Custom Home Control, San Diego, Calif. One of Seamons’ biggest challenges is communicating the real-world value of the connected home. “We have been selling this dream to consumers for more than 30 years, but our biggest (problem) as an industry is still lack of awareness and purpose,” he said. “We are constantly working with our dealers to learn what the real values are to their customers and creating interesting ways to present

Rethinking the Digital Kitchen: Command Central
May 10, 2007

With both LG and Samsung showing flatpanels nestled in the doors of refrigerators and hinting at other IP-addressible appliances to come, kitchen designers and retailers at the 2007 Kitchen Bath Industry Show in Las Vegas this week are asking a very practical question: how do customers/clients really want to use technology in their kitchens? According to Tim Woods, a “ecosystem development” consultant who’s working with a manufacturer research group called the Internet Home Alliance, the answer to that may be quite different than the industry expects. “People love broadband in the kitchen,” he says, “but not for the reasons manufacturers originally thought.

Surviving the Perfect Storm
March 1, 2007

Retailers have spent the months following the 2006 holiday flat panel TV debacle retrenching their businesses to successfully navigate and ride out whatever treacherous water lies ahead. “The perfect storm” is how many retailers and vendors describe what hit the flat panel TV market in the fourth quarter. The conditions were right for disaster: too much supply, too many brands, too much competition, too many unexpected pricing moves and too much discounting. “Everybody was reacting,” said Dave Workman, executive director of the PRO Group. “The wheels came off. Minimum advertised price was less than a suggestion. So things were just being

CES: TOP TRENDS AND TECHNOLOGY
February 1, 2007

More so than ever, CES 2007 was a celebration of convergence, showcasing everything from TVs to audio/video gear to phones to home control systems that combined new technologies with the ease-of-use and convenience consumers expect of traditional electronics. While manufacturers and vendors trumpeted the latest and greatest features and functions of their new offerings, many also established plans to deepen their dealer programs by rolling out more training and demo units to help smaller dealers understand and sell more sophisticated products. In turn, dealers reacted to the products with a mix of outright enthusiasm and guarded optimism. What follows, is the Dealerscope wrap-up

CES: TOP TRENDS AND TECHNOLOGY
February 1, 2007

More so than ever, CES 2007 was a celebration of convergence, showcasing everything from TVs to audio/video gear to phones to home control systems that combined new technologies with the ease-of-use and convenience consumers expect of traditional electronics. While manufacturers and vendors trumpeted the latest and greatest features and functions of their new offerings, many also established plans to deepen their dealer programs by rolling out more training and demo units to help smaller dealers understand and sell more sophisticated products. In turn, dealers reacted to the products with a mix of outright enthusiasm and guarded optimism. What follows, is the Dealerscope wrap-up

Networked
January 1, 2007

The short-term goal of Exceptional Innovation (EI), developer of Windows Media Center-friendly Life|ware software, may not yet be the home control equivalent of a chicken in every pot—Life|ware in every household under the American sun—but that looks to be the long-term route the company is mapping out. “The year 2007 will be the beginning of mass-market bundles of Life|ware,” Mike Seamons, EI’s vice president of marketing, told a press contingent during a November visit to company headquarters in the Columbus, Ohio suburbs, and at locations nearby. Some measured steps already taken in the mass-market direction included a late-fall expansion of distribution beyond the traditional