Microsoft Corporation

News Japan
May 1, 1998

By Mike Ueda ¥ Konica Starts Plastic Pickup Production Konica announced it would begin production of plastic optical pickups for use with CD and DVD players. The company expects to produce 500,000 units per month by year's end. ¥ Sony, Itochu Step Back From DBS in Japan Sony and Itochu decided to forgo entry into the digital broadcast satellite business slated to start-up in Japan in late 2000 and will instead focus on digital broadcasts via communications satellite. Both firms are lead shareholders in SKY PerfecTV, the digital communications satellite broadcaster that launches May 1. Matsushita Electric, Toshiba and Mitsui & Co. remain poised for full entry into

Product Spotlight
May 1, 1998

Curtis Adds Room for More A/C Plugs Curtis solved the problem of too few outlets and too many bulky A/C power adapters with its new 8000 and 9000 Series surge protectors. The 8000 Series can accommodate up to nine A/C adapters; the 9000 Series holds up to eight. In addition, the 8000 Series protects up to two telephone devices. The two models in the 8000 Series retail for $34.99 and $44.99 and are available in May. Call (800) 272-2366. GE Names Half-Pint Microwave Mike Beginning in July GE will introduce college students to "Mike," the anywhere microwave--as GE affectionately describes it. The compact microwave

Comdex Spring Preview - Windows 98 At Center Stage
April 1, 1998

When Comdex Spring opens this month in Chicago, much of the focus will be on the soon-to-be released Windows 98 from Microsoft. A major revision from the current Windows 95, Windows 98 fully integrates Internet Explorer, while adding support for DVD, USB and video input. Aside from the rather vast integration of Explorer into the operating system (you can surf your hard drive from just one window, instead of stacking windows on top of each other), Windows 98's ability to repair itself may likely draw the rave-est reviews. The system software actually checks itself to see if all key components are in place and

Nothing But Net
April 1, 1998

By Rob Yoegel Whether you're directly or indirectly involved in your company's Web site, there is a myriad of products out there touting themselves as the next greatest innovation. Sift through them and rising above the surface is a product line from Adobe, which continues to help people like yourself "express information and ideas more effectively," whether it's electronically or in print. From fonts for desktop publishers, applications geared to the digital artist or Web site design tools, Adobe's product line aims to help you do your job better. One of the most promising offerings is Adobe's Acrobat suite of products. Acrobat is centered around the Portable Document

Nothing But Net
March 1, 1998

By Rob Yoegel During a recent trip to the neighborhood book store, I came across a favorite section--the discount table. There, resting so comfortably, like an Internet Explorer icon on a Windows desktop, was Bill Gates' November 1996 book, The Road Ahead. The asking price? A paltry $2.95, including accompanying CD-ROM with an outdated Web browser. That same week, wire services and major metropolitan newspapers featured stories and photographs of Bill Gates and Netscape CEO Jim Barksdale at a U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee hearing discussing Microsoft's alleged monopoly of the browser market. Sandwiched between the two--lucky him--was Sun Microsystems CEO Scott McNealy. As Microsoft and Netscape battle

News Japan
February 1, 1998

¥ Fujitsu, Sony Sign Chip Deal Fujitsu and Sony agreed to jointly develop the next generation of LSI chips, .18 micron system. The two companies expect to have the first .18 micron DRAM sometime in 1999. The two companies are also studying a joint agreement for .13 micron chips. ¥ One Million Add Cell Phones in Dececember Japan's cellular and PHS service providers added 1,087,000 new subscribers in December 1997. The total number of mobile telephone subscribers is up to 28,740,000. ¥ Pioneer Opens DVD Studio Pioneer opened a DVD production studio in Hong Kong, in anticipation of DVD replacing video CD as the most popular video media in

News Japan
February 1, 1998

¥ Fujitsu, Sony Sign Chip Deal Fujitsu and Sony agreed to jointly develop the next generation of LSI chips, .18 micron system. The two companies expect to have the first .18 micron DRAM sometime in 1999. The two companies are also studying a joint agreement for .13 micron chips. ¥ One Million Add Cell Phones in Dececember Japan's cellular and PHS service providers added 1,087,000 new subscribers in December 1997. The total number of mobile telephone subscribers is up to 28,740,000. ¥ Pioneer Opens DVD Studio Pioneer opened a DVD production studio in Hong Kong, in anticipation of DVD replacing video CD as the most popular video media in

Windows CE Hits the Road
January 1, 1998

By Janet Pinkerton Having shepherded a new handheld Windows CE 2.0 PC to market during COMDEX, Microsoft at CES will unveil two new Windows CE device classes. Slated to be unveiled at the Detroit Auto Show, Jan. 5-7, in addition to CES, the Auto PC is a single DIN, Windows CE-based car stereo head unit designed to be the nexus for a variety of 12V peripherals; Clarion plans to be the early player here. The second new "class," the Palm PC, will be introduced first by Philips and is a pocketable device with a touch sensitive screen designed to organize personal information downloaded from a PC. Meanwhile, Samsung

Passion for Invention Is Allsop's Heritage
January 1, 1998

When Ivor Allsop died October 12 at 82, he left a rich legacy. Allsop Inc., founded in his garage over 30 years ago, has become a company of avid tinkerers, related by blood and business, who believe the world is theirs to improve by invention and redesign, holding over 450 patents world wide. These people also are avid capitalists, so if there's money to be made by improving or developing a product, look out: Anything is fair game. For this legacy of innovation and marketing saavy, Dealerscope names the late Ivor Allsop and his sons Jim and Mike to its Hall of Fame.

Convergence Blows Through Comdex
January 1, 1998

LAS VEGAS-Like a soft summer breeze, the spectre of digital consumer electronics blew gently through COMDEX/Fall '97 as the computer industry prepared for the start of a new era. While there were batches of new palmtops, most notably those based on Microsoft Windows CE 2.0, heaps of new monitors, digital cameras and image editing software, in the back meeting rooms, DTV was in the air. Even on the show floor engineers were discussing how the computing industry and consumer electronics industry would live together in the digital TV era. For a show supposedly about computers, there was a great deal of talk about digital TV and