RealNetworks

Court Orders RealDVD Pulled
October 7, 2008

The DVD-copying software RealDVD, developed by RealNetworks, has been ordered pulled for shelves, after a judge granted an injunction in response to a lawsuit from the motion picture industry. “Due to recent legal action taken by the Hollywood movie studios against us, RealDVD is temporarily unavailable,” reads a message posted on the RealDVD Web site. “Rest assured, we will continue to work diligently to provide you with software that allows you to make a legal copy of your DVDs for your own use.” The issue will be revisited again in court on Tuesday, after a judge has had the opportunity to read all

Studios Move to Block RealDVD
October 1, 2008

RealNetworks this week was sued by the six major Hollywood studios, who seek to prevent the distribution of the company’s RealDVD DVD copying software. According to the AP, the studios claim the software, released this week, would hurt sales of DVDs since customers could simply rent movies for much less money and copy them. The studios also sought a restraining order to prevent sales of the software.

RealNetworks Introduces DVD Copier
September 10, 2008

RealNetworks has introduced what could be a groundbreaking product- a $30 software program that allows for easy copying of DVDs. According to the New York Times, the product, called RealDVD, will allow for easy copying of not only movies, but also extras and even cover artwork. The software allows users to make one and only one copy of movies, which can be viewed on up to five other computers- but only if the other computers also have the software installed. The technology does not work with Blu-ray Discs. Real.com and Amazon will sell the product, the Times said, and is only

New RealPlayer Will “Stream to Go”
June 19, 2007

RealNetworks has announced that the newest version of the RealPlayer application will allow users to grab video from Web sites and download it to a PC or iPod, Variety reported last week. The new product, which RealNetworks executives likened to a computer-based VCR, may very well lead to battles over intellectual property, as one network executive told Variety that the software constitutes “aiding and abetting piracy.” For all the popularity of YouTube and other online video services, there has never before been an easy-to-use method of downloading such content to a hard drive. The new version is expected to be released

DS1206 Timeline.October
December 1, 2006

Best Buy, RealNetworks, SanDisk Conspire to Kill iPod, iTunes Best Buy Co. Inc. creates a music service powered by RealNetworks Inc.’s Rhapsody service and optimized for SanDisk Corp.’s latest digital music players. Called the Best Buy Digital Music Store, it is based on the newly released Rhapsody 4.0, and Sansa e200R Rhapsody players. The players will come preloaded with 30 hours of music from EMI, SonyBMG, Universal and Warner artists. The move is designed to rattle the 88 percent share of the digital music download market held by Apple’s iTunes service and the better than 50 percent share of the digital music player market held by

CES Recap- Audio Plays Big at CES
February 1, 2004

Manufacturer's Hope Is In New Technologies By David Dritsas Despite the growing market for consumer electronics overall, audio is still lagging as a category. But at this year's CES, new technologies and strengthening alliances showed they could help boost the market for the coming year. HD Radio At the forefront of this promise is HD Radio. Prior to the show, iBiquity Digital, the company behind digital radio technology, joined retailer Ultimate Electronics in launching the sale of the first consumer-ready model, a Kenwood HD Receiver for the car (model KTC-HR100 $399), at a store in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. And it looks like more

Electronic Entertainment Expo 2001
July 1, 2001

By Markkus Rovito Video games could be more popular than movies in two years. That is if an estimate cited by the Interactive Digital Software Association (ISDA) that predicts revenue of all computer and console video games will reach $16.9 billion in 2003 comes true. That sum far exceeds estimates of total US movie tickets sales for the same year. If this prediction seems far fetched, current studies that say 96 million Americans play video games are still rather impressive. And with a new wave of exciting game consoles already beginning to hit stores, video games could be the saviour of 2001

Pipeline Products
November 1, 2000

Onkyo Introduces a 6.1 Receiver Just Over $1,000 Although 6.1 home theater receivers are still high-ticket items, prices are starting to drop. Onkyo recently introduced the TX-DS787 6.1 Surround EX receiver for a suggested retail price of $1,049.95. It features decoding for Dolby Digital, DTS and THX's Surround EX, which adds a rear channel to the 5.1 configuration, making it 6.1. The internal amplifier is rated at 100 watts per channel. Inputs/outputs include the normal analog jacks, as well as composite, S-Video and component video inputs and a component video output. Call (201) 825-7950. Low-Priced Lamination From Esselte Esselte, a manufacturer of primarily

Innovation Japan
May 1, 2000

Toshiba Mobile Audio Player MEA110AS Toshiba claims it introduced "the world's first AAC- and MP3-compatible mobile audio player with a SD memory card slot." (AAC is a high-quality sound compression for music distribution and digital satellite broadcasts that will start later this year.) The MEA110AS's SD memory card supports the SDMI-compliant Content Protection for Recordable Media (CPRM) developed by IBM Corp., Intel Corp., Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. and Toshiba. Toshiba entered into agreements with IBM, Intel, Liquid Audio and RealNetworks for digital content protection technologies for electronic music distribution over the Internet. As a result, consumers using Toshiba portable audio players will be immediately

Innovation Japan
May 1, 2000

Toshiba Mobile Audio Player MEA110AS Toshiba claims it introduced "the world's first AAC- and MP3-compatible mobile audio player with a SD memory card slot." (AAC is a high-quality sound compression for music distribution and digital satellite broadcasts that will start later this year.) The MEA110AS's SD memory card supports the SDMI-compliant Content Protection for Recordable Media (CPRM) developed by IBM Corp., Intel Corp., Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. and Toshiba. Toshiba entered into agreements with IBM, Intel, Liquid Audio and RealNetworks for digital content protection technologies for electronic music distribution over the Internet. As a result, consumers using Toshiba portable audio players will be immediately