UT Starcom

Cellphone Makers Hit “Refresh” for 2008 Handsets
April 2, 2008

Screens are bigger, megapixels now start at 2, form factors are lighter and skinnier, and there are more reliable options for content-on-the-go...but the latest handsets on display this week at CTIA 2008 in Las Vegas are, overall, more “improved” than “new.” The good news is that flashy applications which worked fairly well in ‘07 cellphones, like live mobile TV broadcasts, are maturing, which, in the mobile industry, means they’re getting easier, faster and cheaper. The bad news is that there’s no one “Aha!” device (such as last year’s this-changes-everything iPhone) to text home about. But just because mobile manufacturers are mostly refreshing

The Year of the Upgrade
May 1, 2007

Industry watchers say the U.S. cell phone market is at about 75 percent penetration and 143 millions units had sold by the end of 2006, according to the NPD group. In the old days of consumer electronics, retailers might have looked at those figures and figured the profit parade had already passed by, but modern wisdom suggests that wireless devices are a consumer-captivating category that keeps on coming. “What’s driving handset demand is now the replacement cycle,” said Anurag Gupta, senior vice president of investor relations for Brightpoint, a wireless distributor that moved 53.5 million devices (globally) last year. “The U.S. is gaining traction

Cheap Never Looked So Good: Entry Level Handsets at CTIA
March 29, 2007

It’s a little hard to pay attention to phones that cost less than $50 when this year’s CTIA show floor abounds with $400 handsets sporting touch-panel flashiness and GPS capability. But dealers can do well to give the lower price points a little spotlight. “Entry level phones are still a big segment of the market,” says UT Starcom’s Joan Cear. “And the good news is they’re not big and clunky anymore.” Indeed, the entry level phones coming out in 2007 look as slim, sleek and soft-edged as their high-priced design influences. UT Starcom is introducing the CDM 7026 and the CDM 7076, inexpensive

CES: TOP TRENDS AND TECHNOLOGY
February 1, 2007

More so than ever, CES 2007 was a celebration of convergence, showcasing everything from TVs to audio/video gear to phones to home control systems that combined new technologies with the ease-of-use and convenience consumers expect of traditional electronics. While manufacturers and vendors trumpeted the latest and greatest features and functions of their new offerings, many also established plans to deepen their dealer programs by rolling out more training and demo units to help smaller dealers understand and sell more sophisticated products. In turn, dealers reacted to the products with a mix of outright enthusiasm and guarded optimism. What follows, is the Dealerscope wrap-up

CES: TOP TRENDS AND TECHNOLOGY
February 1, 2007

More so than ever, CES 2007 was a celebration of convergence, showcasing everything from TVs to audio/video gear to phones to home control systems that combined new technologies with the ease-of-use and convenience consumers expect of traditional electronics. While manufacturers and vendors trumpeted the latest and greatest features and functions of their new offerings, many also established plans to deepen their dealer programs by rolling out more training and demo units to help smaller dealers understand and sell more sophisticated products. In turn, dealers reacted to the products with a mix of outright enthusiasm and guarded optimism. What follows, is the Dealerscope wrap-up

Small and Proud: More Cellphone Trends from CES
January 12, 2007

As early adopters save their C-notes and prepare to storm Cingular to acquire the stock-boosting iPhone, phone manufacturers are watching the flurry with a cocked eyebrow, wondering if a public which has demanded smaller and smaller handsets with bigger and bigger rebates is really going to go for a substantially-priced convergent device with smartphone heft. Knowing the market is a large and diverse one (Americans have purchased many more cellphones than iPods, at least for now), phone makers are turning out new takes on previous hits, and the new models (of phones and their bluetooth accesories) are almost all significantly smaller than

DealerData
June 13, 2006

The NPD Group reports that mobile phone sales to consumers in the U.S. have reached 34.8 million units in the first quarter of 2006. Representing an increase of more than 11 percent from sales in the first quarter of 2005, NPD predicts total first quarter 2006 consumer sales will be around $2.3 billion. NPD’s Mobile Phone Track percentages show Motorola continuing to lead in the U.S. market. The company experienced an increase in share percentages for its first quarter from 27 percent to 29 percent. Other leaders include Nokia and Samsung with 18 percent and LG at 15 percent. Looking at the GSM market,