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Joe Paone is director of content for CTPG. jpaone@napco.com

High-resolution music download service MusicGiants is using its site to help some neighbors in need. The company, based in Incline Village, Nev., is sponsoring a “charitable media store” and fundraising events to support victims of the recent South Lake Tahoe-area wildfire. The fire has burned thousands of acres, hundreds of buildings and homes, and has forced thousands of local residents people to evacuate. Once the fire is contained, many of them will return to find total loss. At its online music store, MusicGiants has launched the Angora Fire Relief Fund Media Store to generate recurring proceeds for the victims. A portion of download sales

Richard Gray’s Power Company (RGPC) signed Vista Pacific Group as its manufacturer’s representative firm in the combined territories of Southern California and Southern Nevada, including the greater Las Vegas area. “Vista Pacific Group is well positioned to not only service Richard Gray’s existing customer base, but enable RGPC to expand into dealers that we have previously been unable to reach due to limited resources,” stated RGPC Vice President of Sales Jeff Lubitsky. This article originally appeared in Custom Retailer E-Weekly, a publication of Custom Retailer magazine. Click here to subscribe.

New companies in the CE industry pop up everyday, but not everyone brings a fresh new business model to the table, and some names will disappear as quickly as they appeared. But there are those that do succeed and push the industry in new and exciting directions. This month the editors at Dealerscope picked 10 new or emerging companies covering different corners of our market—retail, distribution, and service—we think offer new and interesting concepts and strategies. Time will tell if they have what it takes to become CE superstars, but for now they certainly have a good start. Service provider CE Interactive CEO: Dean

MusicGiants targets new service to "uber" audiophiles, and gives the dealer a piece of the action By Brian Ploskina For some people, it's easy to carry on listening to your iPod or similar device and forget that what you're hearing is distorted, i.e. compressed, music files. Whether the files are stored as MP3s, Windows Media (WMA) or Apple's version of Advanced Audio Coding (AAC), you're still only getting a fraction of the real song. You might say that's the price you pay for the ability to store thousands of songs on a single device and take it anywhere you want. But isn't it strange that when most

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