Grant Clauser

Dealerscope: In this economic climate, what are the bright spots for the A/V community? Perry: Interestingly enough, historically speaking, when the economy starts to slow down and consumers start changing their behavior, one of the behaviors they don’t change is how many televisions they purchase. When consumers are in a crunch—and today consumers are very concerned about gas prices—they tend to drive less. Instead of traveling away, they’re staying closer to home. And what we’re seeing is that consumers are still buying TVs and they’re buying them almost at exactly the same rate. For some consumers whose budgets are a little tighter, they may

FCC Chairman Kevin Martin conducted a press conference Monday to address the state of the DTV transition six months prior to the cutoff of all analog TV broadcasts (with the exception of Wilmington, NC, which makes the switch in September). Commissioner Martin announced a nationwide initiative to increase DTV awareness. The plan specifically targets 80 markets in which more than 100,000 households or 15-percent of households rely on over-the-air signals. The five FCC commissioners and staff will make personal visits to these markets to raise awareness and assist in consumer education. Martin said that the visits will include public events, workshops or commissioner

One of the biggest hurdles when creating an elegant home theater installation, particularly when the home-owner wishes to place display and source devices far apart from each other, is the problem of wires. There are several wireless HDMI solutions being proposed, and some already on the market. Last month a group of manufacturers announced the formation of a partnership to create a standard for wirelessly transmitting high definition called WHDI. What is WHDI? It’s a new standard for wirelessly transmitting uncompressed high-definition video (1080p/60fps) and audio over the unlicensed 5GHz band. It will be able to supply signal to multiple displays at once,

No, a femtocell isn’t a girl robot, a type of cancer or an indy band. It is something that may have a great impact on communications in the near future. In this Cheat Sheet, we review the latest mobile electronics innovation that isn’t an iPhone. What’s a femtocell? A femtocell is a small mobile phone base station that connects to a broadband network. They’re designed to improve the indoor use of cell phones and other cellular devices and bring 3G services to the home. The cell phone communicates to the femtocell base station, which then communications to the owner’s broadband network. A femtocell is

Route 309 in Montgomery County, Pa., the stretch of highway between Philadelphia and Allentown, also known as Bethlehem Pike, is dotted with enough electronics stores to fill the quotas of some western states. Circuit City, a couple of Best Buys, Tweeter, Sears, Boscovs, Wal-Mart, Costco and a few independent specialty stores have all staked their claim in that developing corridor. Last October, a new business hammered up its banner in the Colmar portion of the road to compete against these entrenched competitors. President Jason Spencer calls it The HiTech Life, which grew out of his small IT service company, Adopt-A-Tech, and his father’s

Route 309 in Montgomery County, Pa., the stretch of highway between Philadelphia and Allentown, also known as Bethlehem Pike, is dotted with enough electronics stores to fill the quotas of some western states. Circuit City, a couple of Best Buys, Tweeter, Sears, Boscovs, Wal-Mart, Costco and a few independent specialty stores have all staked their claim in that developing corridor. Last October a new business hammered up it’s banner in the Colmar portion of the road to compete against these entrenched competitors. President Jason Spencer calls it The HiTech Life, which grew out of his small IT service company Adopt-A-Tech and his father’s A/V

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