Makoto Morise

All eyes still look to Japan. While it may be true that the Japanese consumer electronics show, called CEATEC, is nowhere near as grand as the International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in the United States, nor does it gather the same diversity of companies, technologies and visitors, there is something essentially prophetic about Japan's largest electronics show. It is a window into what may be destined for the United States. A High-Definition Debate When it comes to high-definition DVD recording, CEATEC proved that the Blu-ray format is making serious advances toward the future. Prior to the show, members backing the Blu-ray disc announced the

All eyes still look to Japan. While it may be true that the Japanese consumer electronics show, called CEATEC, is nowhere near as grand as the International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in the United States, nor does it gather the same diversity of companies, technologies and visitors, there is something essentially prophetic about Japan's largest electronics show. It is a window into what may be destined for the United States. A High-Definition Debate When it comes to high-definition DVD recording, CEATEC proved that the Blu-ray format is making serious advances toward the future. Prior to the show, members backing the Blu-ray disc announced the

Tokyo, Japan— High-definition recording has taken a step on the road to fruition, though its adoption of a dominant disc format is still in question. In a press conference preceding the CEATEC electronics show in Japan, members backing the Blu-ray disc format of high-definition DVD recording announced the formation of the Blu-ray Disc Association (BDA) and welcomed its first member from the content industry, 20th Century Fox. Blu-ray is a DVD-based format that was introduced in 2002. It can hold up to 25GB of high-definition content on a single-layer disc, with the promise of expandability to larger capacities (50GB, dual-layer discs are planned).

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