Natalie Hope McDonald

Allen & Petersen Cooking & Appliance Center isn’t what it used to be. The full-service retailer in Anchorage, Alaska, has evolved from a traditional appliance store into a gourmet-cooking outpost where aspiring chefs can find everything from kitchen gadgets and gourmet foods to high-end appliances. They can also enroll in cooking classes at the center’s own culinary school. “We wanted to be more than just an appliance store,” said Leon Barbachano, CEO of A&P. “Basically, we say that we sell the best equipment to cook on, the best tools to cook with and the instruction to tie it all together. The Cooking School is

As the largest inland port in the country, it’s not surprising that Pennsylvania’s one-time industrial hub has remained home to a century’s old company at the forefront of reverse logistics, a vague phrase with a very powerful meaning: less e-waste and more profit for retailers. Just a few miles northeast of downtown Pittsburgh is Papercraft Park, home to GENCO Supply Chain Solutions, a company that began in 1898 as a horse-and-buggy “trucking” company and has since blossomed into the second-largest supply-chain headquarters in North America. While the company offers a breadth of solutions for pharmaceutical and government agencies, it’s real value for the CE

As the big box retailers of the world bulk up their inventory and square footage, Denmark-based Bang & Olufsen is doing business a little differently. The high-end electronics supplier has started rolling out a svelte new retail expansion plan—650-sq.-feet at a time. “Plans are underway for the first of the eight stores to open,” says Kim Gravesen, president of Bang & Olufsen America in Arlington Heights, Ill., in a press statement. The new retail concept will mirror the company’s larger showroom models found around the world by using minimalist Scandinavian design and interactive displays. The new stores also include three home theater set-ups and

As the big box retailers of the world bulk up their inventory and square footage, Denmark-based Bang & Olufsen is doing business a little differently. The high-end electronics supplier has started rolling out a svelte new retail expansion plan—650 sq. feet at a time. “Plans are underway for the first of the eight stores to open,” says Kim Gravesen, president of Bang & Olufsen America in Arlington Heights, Ill, in a press statement. The new retail concept will mirror the company’s larger showroom models found around the world by using minimalist Scandinavian design and interactive displays. The new stores also include three home theater

Mention Internet Protocol (IP) to plenty of custom audio and video installers and you’ll likely solicit a slew of reactions, some of which may not be very kind. While IT professionals have long been hip to digital comeuppance, plenty of CE dealers aren’t necessarily ready to toss aside their speaker wire for what they see as nothing more than a glorified computer network. Whether one likes it or not, this difference of opinion nevertheless signals an important change in the industry compared to just a few short years ago, when the idea of IP-based home entertainment was considered far more theoretical than practical.

According to Richard Spalding, co-founder and mareketing director of Kontraband, an entertainment Web site, a common mistake businesses make is distributing content that’s not engaging enough or tied closely enough to the bigger marketing message. “Another common problem is when too much user data is required to play or interact with the viral. The consumer having to get involved with excessive signing-up procedures really hampers the chances of something going viral,” he says. But when viral marketing works, useful contact information can be collected for future promotions. “Marketing departments can know whether the campaign is on target,” says Spalding. “The data can be used

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