Sam Walton

Peter Weedfald is the Senior Vice President of Sales and Marketing for Sharp Electronics Marketing Company of America, and the author of Green Reign Leadership, designed to enlist superior sales and marketing principles and market leadership. 

A Local-Social Strategy to Make Big-Box Stores More Relevant to Their Communities Long before the digital age, all business was local and social. Customer engagement was paramount. Shopkeepers, barbers and Avon ladies alike intuitively knew that their ability to connect with customers would often determine whether a purchase would be made. They understood that building long-standing relationships with customers would result in repeat visits and loyalty. For many successful proprietors, this meant knowing customers by name, remembering their likes and dislikes and being on hand to answer product questions. Years before founding Walmart, at the age of 26, Sam

(As told to Janet Pinkerton): The electronics industry has been in a recession for over six months. There’s going to be great opportunity in our industry today, but there’s going to be two kinds of businesses this year and next year: the quick and the dead. If you’re not totally involved in your business, I’m recommending you get out quick. They (higher prices) have been hitting, but (U.S.) retailers have refused to accept the price increase so distributors and manufacturers are being squeezed out. The large big boxes are continuing to dig in their heels, saying ‘We do not to

About 40 years ago, Sam Walton told John Kiefer: "If you really want to see what's going to happen, you don't want to talk to old guys. You want to look at the kids. If you look at the kids in the sandbox, you can look at everything you need to know about marketing." At the time, Walton was opening up a chain of tiny variety stores across Arkansas and Kansas. The first Wal-Mart debuted in Rogers, Arkansas, in 1962. Kiefer's distribution business, Kief's Records & Stereo Supply, serviced the record departments in the first six Wal-Mart stores. The "look at the kids

CE Retailing in the 20th Century By Natalie Hope McDonald & David Dritsas In 1944, Chicago-based Arrow Radio & Appliance Shop made $1,000 a month in radio repairs by adding a unique feature to its store. Proprietor Al Palacz screened something that the average consumer didn't yet have access to—television. The Zenith-branded motion picture projections were shown in the store every Wednesday, attracting new customers with popular shows of the day. This retail tactic is still going strong at modern-day Sounds Like Music in Phoenix, Arizona, where President Dave Wiggs installed a 15-foot-wide screen in his own storefront window to attract would-be home

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